Absinthe Tasting Notes

Find interesting comments and tasting notes about absinthes available on Absinthes.com – by real experts!

Freiburg Absinthe tasting notes by Marc Thuillier

Another organic absinthe you shall say, one more on the list… Yes but! The Freiburg Absinthe comes from Germany and more importantly, it’s distilled with a grape pomace alcohol base, a very well known alcohol in Italy under the name Grappa. Absinthe + Germany + Organic + Grappa = way too many things? Do not draw conclusions too hastily and see my tasting notes instead.

This absinthe is made by Andreas Dilger, a very renowned winemaker in the Freiburg region of South Germany. He’s most well-known for his organic wines derived from biodynamic viticulture.

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Absinthe Valdetra Verte tasting notes by Marc Thuillier

Absinthe Valdetra Verte is distilled by Gaudentia Persoz in Couvet, Val-de-Travers. There are still not many green absinthes in this Swiss region, and the road has been quite long to get there. In fact, only clear absinthes were clandestinely distilled there before the lift of the ban in Switzerland in 2005, simply because it required less herbs and less time than for making a Verte. The first green absinthes that popped up in the Val-de-Travers were sometimes not really pleasant to drink… Let’s see how they are today.

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Absinthe Philippe Lasala Tasting Notes by Marc Thuillier

Absinthe Philippe Lasala is one of the cheapest Spanish absenta, so one would expect a ‘cheap’ taste too, like some of the vile fluorescent oil mixes made in Czech Republic. But while it is not traditionally distilled and made from a mix of herbal essences, it definitely not has a ‘cheap taste’. Marc Thuillier recently heard that the Lasala had improved over the years and was very curious to taste it. Here are his tasting notes.

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Absinthe Vieux Pontarlier FDC 3 ans Tasting Notes by Marc Thuillier

Absinthe Vieux Pontarlier is a timeless classic from the Emile Pernot distillery in Pontarlier. Three years ago, Dominique Rousselet, director of the distillery, decided to reserve part of a batch in order to age it in a oak barrel. 3 years later, here it is, finally, bottled and ready to be drunk. That’s exactly what Marc Thuillier did immediately after receiving his bottle. Here are his tasting notes:

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