Author: Marc

Absinthe Philippe Lasala Tasting Notes by Marc Thuillier

Absinthe Philippe Lasala is one of the cheapest Spanish absenta, so one would expect a ‘cheap’ taste too, like some of the vile fluorescent oil mixes made in Czech Republic. But while it is not traditionally distilled and made from a mix of herbal essences, it definitely not has a ‘cheap taste’. Marc Thuillier recently heard that the Lasala had improved over the years and was very curious to taste it. Here are his tasting notes.

(more…)

Read More

Absinthe Vieux Pontarlier FDC 3 ans Tasting Notes by Marc Thuillier

Absinthe Vieux Pontarlier is a timeless classic from the Emile Pernot distillery in Pontarlier. Three years ago, Dominique Rousselet, director of the distillery, decided to reserve part of a batch in order to age it in a oak barrel. 3 years later, here it is, finally, bottled and ready to be drunk. That’s exactly what Marc Thuillier did immediately after receiving his bottle. Here are his tasting notes:

(more…)

Read More

Absinthe Jade Terminus Absinthe Oxygenee Review by Marc Thuillier

Jade Terminus Absinthe Oxygenee is the latest (re)creation from Ted Breaux, Jade Liqueurs. The process used is similar to the one used by the famous distillery Cusenier back in the glory days. Cusenier were using a hot oxygenation process to make their absinthe appear as “pure” as possible to their customers. How does this process impact the taste of such a fine handcrafted absinthe? Marc Thuillier has tasted this one from a 2017 batch for Absinthes.com. (more…)

Read More

Absinthe Angélique Verte Suisse tasting notes by Marc Thuillier

Angéliquebuy_absinthe_angelique_online is the “green” big sister of the Clandestine from Claude-Alain Bugnon (68% versus 53%). Produced in the Artemisia distillery in the Val-de-Travers, its recipe includes 12 different herbs, with of course, as the name itself indicates: angelica (Angélique in French).

It is supposedly rebel and wild, let’s see what Marc Thuillier thinks of this Verte:

(more…)

Read More

The different ways of preparing a glass of absinthe

Here are the different ways of preparing an absinthe glass using antique – or modern – accoutrements:

1 – Carafes and Pitchers

Of course, the use of a carafe filled with ice-cold water was the most common and the very first known method for preparing an absinthe glass back in the 19th century; there are dozens of period photos and sketches showing this.

Pitchers were less widely used, especially in bustling bistros and cafés because of their fragility. Having said that, we have found numerous types of pitchers which were dedicated to the absinthe ritual and advertised as such in 1900’s catalogues.

Read More